Vanessa Barbay

My art stems from the impact of Aboriginal culture on my practice and worldview and the passion of my late Hungarian-born father, Tibor, for taxidermy. During my doctoral research (2009-2013) I developed a new way of generating images harnessing the decomposition of animal bodies to produce a body print that I call the shroud. 'Rising (Spring Kookaburra)' and 'Falling (Spring Kookaburra)' 2020 form part of a triptych that can be viewed on my blog http://laomedia.com. The third work is the shroud of the kookaburra featured, which was found and decomposed on canvas at Worrowing homestead in 2017. Vanessa Barbay was the winner of the People's Choice Award in the 2019 SeeChange Making Community Exhibition.

Vanessa Barbay

My art stems from the impact of Aboriginal culture on my practice and worldview and the passion of my late Hungarian-born father, Tibor, for taxidermy. During my doctoral research (2009-2013) I developed a new way of generating images harnessing the decomposition of animal bodies to produce a body print that I call the shroud. ‘Rising (Spring Kookaburra)’ and ‘Falling (Spring Kookaburra)’ 2020 form part of a triptych that can be viewed on my blog http://laomedia.com. The third work is the shroud of the kookaburra featured, which was found and decomposed on canvas at Worrowing homestead in 2017. Vanessa Barbay was the winner of the People’s Choice Award in the 2019 SeeChange Making Community Exhibition.

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